Advancing Equitable Transit-Oriented Development through Community Partnerships and Public Sector Leadership

Overview

This report spotlights four regional eTOD case studies and different approaches to support more inclusive growth. In Denver, a multi-sector coalition pioneered a new funding tool to acquire land near transit for equitable development. In Los Angeles, the transit agency has adopted bold new policies that commit its resources to ensuring affordable housing is developed on agency-owned real estate assets. In Minneapolis – Saint Paul, philanthropy stepped forward to strategically invest resources in a set of comprehensive community building efforts while also serving as an intermediary between public, private and community stakeholders. And in Seattle, the City is working to address workforce development and commercial stabilization among some of its most ethnically diverse transit-served communities.
 
Each of the four case studies provide lessons learned for other communities, including: 
  • Transit agencies can set the bar for equitable TOD.
  • Publicly-held land assets create powerful leverage point.
  • Make racial equity an explicit goal.
  • Measure impact to tell your story.
  • History and Culture Matter
  • Collaboration and patience pay off.
  • Transit is about more than just a line.

Integrating Family Financial Security into Cradle-to-Career Pipelines: Learning Lessons from Promise Neighborhoods

Overview

More than 14 million American children are caught in poverty’s grip, lacking academic, familial, and health supports to provide them a step up into the middle class.1 Mirroring the racial wealth gap, the majority of these children come from families of color who are unable to get ahead, resulting in inadequacies that inhibit the individual child’s potential, the potential of
their families, and that of their communities to contribute to, and benefit from, our growing economy.  Many would suggest that a strong emphasis on financial literacy could help families overcome this problem. However, research shows that financial education alone does very little to impact the financial health of low-income households. What is needed, experts say, is financial education that is tied to actual skill-building opportunities through the use of quality financial products. At PolicyLink, we agreed with that thinking and took it a step further. Since low-income communities across the country are facing many systemic barriers that entrench poverty, efforts to address financial insecurity will require an in-depth strategy that can work with youth and their families over time. The missing element became clear: a coalescing force to bridge these interventions and form effective, efficient, results-driven systems from cradle to career.Across the country, the federal Promise Neighborhoods program has been building the infrastructure necessary to achieve these goals, challenging and rebuilding inequitable systems so that all children and families can fully participate in and benefit from a just and fair society. That is why, with the generous support of the Citi Foundation, PolicyLink and the Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) joined
forces with five of these communities to design and carry out strategies for embedding financial security into their pipelines of supports. The goal was to enhance theoverall outcomes of Promise Neighborhoods by empowering youth and their families to gain control over their financial lives and thus, their economic futures.

Integrating Family Financial Security into Cradle-to-Career Pipelines: Learning Lessons from Promise Neighborhoods

Overview

With support from Citi Foundation, PolicyLink and the Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) joined forces with five PNI communities (Brooklyn, New York; Los Angeles, California; Chula Vista, California; Orlando, Florida; and Indianola, Mississippi) to design and carry out strategies for embedding financial security into their pipelines of supports. The collaborative effort set out to embed the concepts of budgeting, emergency savings, saving for college, credit access, into existing PNI programs. The goal was to enhance the overall outcomes of Promise Neighborhoods by empowering youth and their families to gain control over their financial lives and thus, their economic futures. This report documents the early lessons from each promise neighborhood site and highlights the importance of including a financial security strategy as an essential part of a cradle-to-career continuum.

Leveraging Anchor Institutions for Economic Inclusion

Overview

Anchor institutions, such as colleges and universities, hospitals and health-care facilities, utilities, faith-based organizations and museums have a role to play in driving economic growth. This brief is an introduction to developing and implementing an anchor strategy that can advance equity and economic inclusion in order to promote regional prosperity. It provides actionable recommendations for federal Economic Resilience and Sustainable Communities grantees and their broad range of regional partners.

An Equity Profile of the Cape Fear Region

Overview

The Cape Fear region in North Carolina is experiencing a demographic transformation characterized by a diversifying younger population and a rapidly growing senior population that is predominantly White. To secure a thriving economy for the decades to come, the region must tap the economic potential of its growing young population. Building education and career pathways for all and ensuring young workers are prepared for the jobs of the future are key strategies for inclusive growth in the region. Download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

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