Indianapolis - Closing Opportunity Gaps Through Industrial Redevelopment

Overview

The Equitable Innovation Economies (EIE) pilot presented an opportune moment for LISC Indianapolis and Plan2020 to work collaboratively to reach the dual goals of embedding equity objectives in an emerging citywide policy framework, as well as in LISC’s industrial revitalization activities.

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Portland - Cultivating Diverse Leaders And An Inclusive Startup Culture

Overview

PDC, Portland’s redevelopment, urban renewal, and economic development agency, has documented that change is coming — according to the National Equity Atlas, by 2040, 42 percent of the city’s population will be people of color. Recognizing the fact that Portland’s economic future is tied to growing the wealth of the city’s communities of color, he agency made equity and inclusion the central themes of its five-year strategic plan, adopted in 2015.

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New York - Building A 21st Century Production Economy For All New Yorkers

Overview

The company has three founders of color who graduated from the Pratt Institute’s Industrial and Product Design programs in 2014 and 2015. The following year, Wear.works received an initial prototyping budget, access to mentorship and support, and other resources to launch their business as one of six fellows of the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC)’s Next Top Makers program.

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San Jose - Building Pathways To Good-Paying Jobs In The Heart Of Silicon Valley

Overview

San Jose has been a bastion of high-tech manufacturing since the emergence of Silicon Valley, but the future of this industry is far from assured. To strengthen the sector and open up opportunities for a new generation of diverse workers, the City is using a silo-busting strategy that combines business support, workforce development, and land use preservation.

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Integrating Family Financial Security into Cradle-to-Career Pipelines: Learning Lessons from Promise Neighborhoods

Overview

More than 14 million American children are caught in poverty’s grip, lacking academic, familial, and health supports to provide them a step up into the middle class.1 Mirroring the racial wealth gap, the majority of these children come from families of color who are unable to get ahead, resulting in inadequacies that inhibit the individual child’s potential, the potential of
their families, and that of their communities to contribute to, and benefit from, our growing economy.  Many would suggest that a strong emphasis on financial literacy could help families overcome this problem. However, research shows that financial education alone does very little to impact the financial health of low-income households. What is needed, experts say, is financial education that is tied to actual skill-building opportunities through the use of quality financial products. At PolicyLink, we agreed with that thinking and took it a step further. Since low-income communities across the country are facing many systemic barriers that entrench poverty, efforts to address financial insecurity will require an in-depth strategy that can work with youth and their families over time. The missing element became clear: a coalescing force to bridge these interventions and form effective, efficient, results-driven systems from cradle to career.Across the country, the federal Promise Neighborhoods program has been building the infrastructure necessary to achieve these goals, challenging and rebuilding inequitable systems so that all children and families can fully participate in and benefit from a just and fair society. That is why, with the generous support of the Citi Foundation, PolicyLink and the Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) joined
forces with five of these communities to design and carry out strategies for embedding financial security into their pipelines of supports. The goal was to enhance theoverall outcomes of Promise Neighborhoods by empowering youth and their families to gain control over their financial lives and thus, their economic futures.

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