Advancing Equitable Transit-Oriented Development through Community Partnerships and Public Sector Leadership

Overview

This report spotlights four regional eTOD case studies and different approaches to support more inclusive growth. In Denver, a multi-sector coalition pioneered a new funding tool to acquire land near transit for equitable development. In Los Angeles, the transit agency has adopted bold new policies that commit its resources to ensuring affordable housing is developed on agency-owned real estate assets. In Minneapolis – Saint Paul, philanthropy stepped forward to strategically invest resources in a set of comprehensive community building efforts while also serving as an intermediary between public, private and community stakeholders. And in Seattle, the City is working to address workforce development and commercial stabilization among some of its most ethnically diverse transit-served communities.
 
Each of the four case studies provide lessons learned for other communities, including: 
  • Transit agencies can set the bar for equitable TOD.
  • Publicly-held land assets create powerful leverage point.
  • Make racial equity an explicit goal.
  • Measure impact to tell your story.
  • History and Culture Matter
  • Collaboration and patience pay off.
  • Transit is about more than just a line.

Integrating Family Financial Security into Cradle-to-Career Pipelines: Learning Lessons from Promise Neighborhoods

Overview

More than 14 million American children are caught in poverty’s grip, lacking academic, familial, and health supports to provide them a step up into the middle class.1 Mirroring the racial wealth gap, the majority of these children come from families of color who are unable to get ahead, resulting in inadequacies that inhibit the individual child’s potential, the potential of
their families, and that of their communities to contribute to, and benefit from, our growing economy.  Many would suggest that a strong emphasis on financial literacy could help families overcome this problem. However, research shows that financial education alone does very little to impact the financial health of low-income households. What is needed, experts say, is financial education that is tied to actual skill-building opportunities through the use of quality financial products. At PolicyLink, we agreed with that thinking and took it a step further. Since low-income communities across the country are facing many systemic barriers that entrench poverty, efforts to address financial insecurity will require an in-depth strategy that can work with youth and their families over time. The missing element became clear: a coalescing force to bridge these interventions and form effective, efficient, results-driven systems from cradle to career.Across the country, the federal Promise Neighborhoods program has been building the infrastructure necessary to achieve these goals, challenging and rebuilding inequitable systems so that all children and families can fully participate in and benefit from a just and fair society. That is why, with the generous support of the Citi Foundation, PolicyLink and the Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) joined
forces with five of these communities to design and carry out strategies for embedding financial security into their pipelines of supports. The goal was to enhance theoverall outcomes of Promise Neighborhoods by empowering youth and their families to gain control over their financial lives and thus, their economic futures.

Integrating Family Financial Security into Cradle-to-Career Pipelines: Learning Lessons from Promise Neighborhoods

Overview

With support from Citi Foundation, PolicyLink and the Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) joined forces with five PNI communities (Brooklyn, New York; Los Angeles, California; Chula Vista, California; Orlando, Florida; and Indianola, Mississippi) to design and carry out strategies for embedding financial security into their pipelines of supports. The collaborative effort set out to embed the concepts of budgeting, emergency savings, saving for college, credit access, into existing PNI programs. The goal was to enhance the overall outcomes of Promise Neighborhoods by empowering youth and their families to gain control over their financial lives and thus, their economic futures. This report documents the early lessons from each promise neighborhood site and highlights the importance of including a financial security strategy as an essential part of a cradle-to-career continuum.

Leveraging Anchor Institutions for Economic Inclusion

Overview

Anchor institutions, such as colleges and universities, hospitals and health-care facilities, utilities, faith-based organizations and museums have a role to play in driving economic growth. This brief is an introduction to developing and implementing an anchor strategy that can advance equity and economic inclusion in order to promote regional prosperity. It provides actionable recommendations for federal Economic Resilience and Sustainable Communities grantees and their broad range of regional partners.

An Equity Profile of the Cape Fear Region

Overview

The Cape Fear region in North Carolina is experiencing a demographic transformation characterized by a diversifying younger population and a rapidly growing senior population that is predominantly White. To secure a thriving economy for the decades to come, the region must tap the economic potential of its growing young population. Building education and career pathways for all and ensuring young workers are prepared for the jobs of the future are key strategies for inclusive growth in the region. Download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the Cape Fear Region (Summary)

Overview

The Cape Fear region in North Carolina is experiencing a demographic transformation characterized by a diversifying younger population and a rapidly growing senior population that is predominantly White. To secure a thriving economy for the decades to come, the region must tap the economic potential of its growing young population. Building education and career pathways for all and ensuring young workers are prepared for the jobs of the future are key strategies for inclusive growth in the region. Download the full profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the Research Triangle Region

Overview

The Research Triangle Region has a long tradition of growth and change, as its research universities and technologically sophisticated businesses have served markets and attracted people from across the United States and around the world. From the city cores of Raleigh and Durham to small towns and rural areas throughout the region, the communities that make up the Research Triangle have a common goal of seeing that all its people have pathways to success. Download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the Research Triangle Region (Summary)

Overview

The Research Triangle Region has a long tradition of growth and change, as its research universities and technologically sophisticated businesses have served markets and attracted people from across the United States and around the world. From the city cores of Raleigh and Durham to small towns and rural areas throughout the region, the communities that make up the Research Triangle have a common goal of seeing that all its people have pathways to success. Download the full profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

Building Place-Based Initiatives for Boys and Men of Color and Vulnerable Populations: A Community Planning Guide

Overview

This guide provides information about how communities can implement the next phase of achieving priority outcomes for boys and men of color. It focuses on two critical areas of work: 1) how to conduct a policy review and formulate recommendations for action and 2) how to develop an action plan. The sections contain specific guidelines for taking these next steps. In addition, the appendices include a template for organizing the policy review and suggested components of the action plan.

Strengthening the Pine Ridge Economy

Overview

The Pine Ridge reservation, home of Oglala Lakota people, sits within a broader regional economic context whose primary sectors include tourism, agriculture, manufacturing, and retail.1 The Pine Ridge Reservation and the Rapid City Metropolitan area are interdependent economies that, to date, channel many economic benefits off-reservation. This Equity and Opportunity Assessment identifies key strategies to create greater vibrancy and equity in reservation-based economic activity—to increase prosperity and quality of life for both the Oglala Lakota people and the region as a whole.

Values, Leadership, and Sustainability: Institutionalizing Community-Centered Policing - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

This brief, the fourth and final in the Beyond Confrontation Series, examines how leadership can build the values and institutional culture necessary to implement and sustain community-centered policing. The brief also highlights workforce management, information sharing, and accountability practices that integrate community policing into law enforcement agency operations over the long term. (2015)

A Roadmap Toward Equity: Housing Solutions for Oakland, California

Overview

Oakland, California, faces a serious shortage of affordable housing. Commissioned by the Oakland City Council, A Roadmap Toward Equity analyzes the depth of the problem and presents more than a dozen policy solutions for preventing displacement, increasing the stock of affordable housing, and improving housing habitability for all Oakland residents.

Local Food Procurement - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Provides an overview of how stakeholders can advocate for and implement local food procurement policies in an equitable manner. (2015)

Turning Back the Tide: Promising Efforts to Demilitarize Police Departments - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

This brief, the third in the Beyond Confrontation Series, explores the stark landscape of pervasive police militarization, and lifts up early examples of communities fighting to reverse the tide of militarization and restore a focus on community to local and state police departments. (2015)

Engaging Communities as Partners: Strategies for Problem Solving - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

This brief, the second in the Beyond Confrontation Series, lifts up examples from across the country where communities and police have begun demonstrating how to collaborate and build working relationships that increase safety, decrease arrests and police violence, and improve the well-being of community members. (2015)

Limiting Police Use of Force: Promising Community- Centered Strategies - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

This brief, the first in the Beyond Confrontation Series, lifts up proven practices, as well as less tested but innovative and thoughtful efforts to address the use of force. It provides information to help communities better understand what standards guide the use of police force, how that force is applied across the country, and what strategies exist to minimize these acts of aggression. (2015)

Building Momentum from the Ground Up: A Toolkit for Promoting Justice in Policing - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Communities across the country that have lived for too long under the weight of discriminatory policing and mass incarceration are calling for a transformation of our policing and criminal justice systems. They are making it clear that it is time for policies to first and foremost reflect the concerns and solutions of communities most affected by flawed policing practices. The toolkit elevates 15 recommended policy reforms and showcases best practices, successful organizing efforts, and model legislation from across the country. (2015)

An Equity Profile of the San Francisco Bay Area Region

Overview

The Bay Area is booming, but a rising tide economy is not lifting up its low-income communities and communities of color. As communities of color continue to drive growth and change in the region, addressing wide racial inequities and ensuring people of color can fully participate as workers, entrepreneurs, and innovators is an urgent priority. Our analysis finds that the regional economy could have been $117 billion stronger in 2012 had its racial gaps in income and employment. This profile, produced for The San Francisco Foundation, describes the region’s demographic transformation and performance on a series of equity indicators. Download summary here.

An Equity Profile of the San Francisco Bay Area Region (Summary)

Overview

The Bay Area is booming, but a rising tide economy is not lifting up its low-income communities and communities of color. As communities of color continue to drive growth and change in the region, addressing wide racial inequities and ensuring people of color can fully participate as workers, entrepreneurs, and innovators is an urgent priority. Our analysis finds that the regional economy could have been $117 billion stronger in 2012 had its racial gaps in income and employment. This profile, produced for The San Francisco Foundation, describes the region’s demographic transformation and performance on a series of equity indicators. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

A Developmental Pathway for Achieving Promise Neighborhoods Results

Overview

This important tool was developed to help Promise Neighborhood communities and the field at large better understand the external conditions and developmental milestones that are needed to build the cradle to career continuum and to achieve the goals/outcomes set forth in Promise Neighborhoods. The tool illustrates the developmental pathways necessary to achieve the Promise Neighborhoods vision.

Strategies for Strengthening Anchor Institutions’ Community Impact

Overview

Anchor institutions are large, place-based organizations, often public or nonprofit, that exist as core fixtures in local communities. This brief provides promising examples where anchor institutions have engaged in activities to advance economic inclusion, promote access to employment, and otherwise improve the circumstances faced by boys and men of color. It draws on a scan of national best practices originally developed for the City of New Orleans.

Strategies for Health-Care Workforce Development

Overview

This brief identifies a number of promising programs and practices in the health-care sector that promotes access to economic opportunities for people of color and other individuals facing barriers to opportunity. It draws on a scan of national best practices originally developed for the City of New Orleans.

Strategies for Wraparound Services for African American Men Seeking Employment

Overview

This brief presents promising practices for wrapping young men of color in supports such as pre-employment services, transitional jobs, and job placement services. It draws on a scan of national best practices originally developed for the City of New Orleans.

Strategies for Addressing Equity in Infrastructure and Public Works

Overview

This brief presents case studies and promising practices for connecting hard-to-employ job seekers, men of color, and low-income residents to temporary and permanent job opportunities in the infrastructure sector. Featured are targeted first-source hiring and contracting programs implemented through community workforce agreements (CWAs), community benefit agreements (CBAs), and/or project labor agreements (PLAs). The document draws on a scan of national best practices originally developed for the City of New Orleans.

Key Strategies to Advance Equitable Growth in Regions

Overview

Achieving equitable growth in cities and regions will require a new set of tools, innovative leveraging of resources, and unprecedented levels of collaboration. This report draws from the work already underway in more than 40 cities and regions to connect low-income people and communities of color to the economic mainstream. It lifts up strategies concentrated in seven areas, all helping communities to plan for equitable growth, remove employment barriers, grow good jobs, and strengthen the education pipeline.

Regional Planning for Health Equity

Overview

This brief introduces strategies for planning for health equity at a regional scale and summarizes the movement for building healthy communities. It draws from the experiences of regional equity coalitions and metropolitan planning organizations to identify five important conditions that must be met to achieve effective results.

All-In Cities: Building an Equitable Economy from the Ground Up

Overview

As cities come back, leaders must bake equity and inclusion into their growth strategies. This framing paper for the All-In Cities initiative, released at the 2015 Equity Summit in Los Angeles, shares cross-cutting practices and an eight-point policy framework to build equitable, thriving cities. See the report here.

Transforming West Oakland

Overview

The first of a three-part series by PolicyLink and Mandela MarketPlace, this case study highlights the ongoing work of Mandela MarketPlace and its partners to build a local food system that prioritizes community ownership in the San Francisco Bay Area. This first case study provides an overview of the organization, offers a historical context of its development, and outlines critical factors that contributed to its existing infrastructure and framework of local ownership. 

View the accompanying photo essay, with original photography from Mandela MartketPlace, and read this blog post by Dana Harvey, executive director at Mandela MarketPlace.

Read the second case study, Cultivating Equitable Food-Oriented Development: Lessons from West Oakland, which explores how the Mandela ecosystem has grown and evolved, and the operations, inner workings, and relationships across its tightly woven network. View the accompanying photo essay, with original photography from Mandela MartketPlace, including a photo courtesy of Michael Short Photography.

An Equity Profile of Detroit

Overview

The Detroit region is undergoing growth and change. After losing approximately 156,000 people between 2000 and 2010, the region is projected to reverse its recent losses and grow by about 5 percent over the next 30 years. People of color will make up a growing share of the population, with much of that growth propelled by Latinos and Asians. An infusion of new public and private investments along with middle-wage job growth is also fueling an economic recovery, what some have called a Detroit Renaissance. However, not everyone will benefit unless business, community, and political leaders work together to connect people of color to jobs, business opportunities, quality education and career training, and healthy homes and neighborhoods. Download summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Detroit - Summary

Overview

The Detroit region is undergoing growth and change. After losing approximately 156,000 people between 2000 and 2010, the region is projected to reverse its recent losses and grow by about 5 percent over the next 30 years. People of color will make up a growing share of the population, with much of that growth propelled by Latinos and Asians. An infusion of new public and private investments along with middle-wage job growth is also fueling an economic recovery, what some have called a Detroit Renaissance. However, not everyone will benefit unless business, community, and political leaders work together to connect people of color to jobs, business opportunities, quality education and career training, and healthy homes and neighborhoods. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

Breaking the Cycle: From Poverty to Financial Security for All

Overview

This report explores and provides examples of how key changes to components of the financial, education, justice, health, and tax systems can strengthen—rather than undermine—households’ financial security, and increase economic inclusion.

It describes innovative approaches that integrate a focus on building financial security across programs, while reforming the systems that most affect the balance sheets of lower-income families and families of color. The featured approaches run the gamut from small local programs to state and federal policy reforms and initiatives. These innovations and the changes that they represent to key systems may be adapted and expanded to strengthen the financial security of vulnerable people and communities nationwide.

Equitable Food Hubs - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Describes food hubs as an emerging retail strategy that has the potential to create a more equitable food system. (2014)

Health Equity: Moving Beyond "Health Disparities"

Overview

A health equity movement is underway, in which broad sectors are working together to create solutions to the complex problem of health inequities. This paper lifts up solutions that are grounded in strengthening communities, engaging non-health sectors, lifting up promising practices, advancing progressive policy options, and identifying research gaps that can make the case for prioritizing health equity strategies.  
 

An Equity Profile of Southeast Florida Region

Overview

Communities of color are driving Southeast Florida’s population growth, and their ability to participate and thrive is central to the region’s economic success. But wide racial gaps in income, health, and opportunity place its future at risk. Creating good jobs, connecting youth and vulnerable workers to training and career pathways, and increasing access to economic opportunities can secure a bright economic future for the region. PolicyLink and the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) produced this profile in partnership with the Southeast Florida Regional Planning Partnership. You can also download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

Common Market Case Study: Rebuilding a Regional Food Economy and Increasing Access to Healthy Food

Overview

Common Market is a regional food hub whose mission is to increase the availability of local, sustainably grown farm food throughout Philadelphia and surrounding areas. This case study provides an in-depth look at Common Market's growth and development, including efforts to build financial sustainability.

Partnership for Sustainable Communities: Five Years of Learning from Communities and Coordinating Federal Investments

Overview

In celebration of the fifth anniversary of the Partnership for Sustainable Communities, HUD, DOT, and EPA released their five year annual report. This report shows how the three agencies are changing their policies and removing barriers to help communities provide more housing choices, make transportation systems more efficient and reliable, and create vibrant neighborhoods while protecting the environment.

An Equity Profile of the Houston-Galveston Region, Addendum

Overview

Houston-Galveston is characterized by overall economic strength and resilience, but wide racial gaps in income, health, and opportunity coupled with declining wages, a shrinking middle class, and rising inequality place the region’s economic success and future at risk. Our analysis showed the region already stands to gain a great deal from addressing racial inequities. If racial gaps in income had been closed in 2012, the regional economy would have been $243.3 billion stronger: a 54 percent increase. You can also download the full profile and summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

Profile: Corbin Hill Food Project

Overview

The Corbin Hill Food Project (CHFP) is working to bridge the gap between farm communities growing local produce and city communities that want and need healthy food. By building upon food hub and community supported agriculture (CSA) retail models, CHFP connects family-owned farms upstate to black, Latino, and immigrant residents. In line with the organization’s food justice mission that incorporates healthy food advocacy and community-based programming, CHFP has created a Farm Share program that seeks to attract urban populations that are traditionally not members of CSAs.

See photos here.

Building an Equitable Tax Code: A Primer for Advocates

Overview

In recent years a national discussion has been underway about the causes and effects of growing inequality, but one cause that has received little attention is the role of the U.S. tax code. The individual tax code contains more than $1 trillion in tax subsidies known to policymakers and economists as tax expenditures because, like spending programs, they provide financial assistance to support specific activities or groups of people. Of these subsidies, more than half a trillion, $540 billion, support some form of savings or investment (e.g., higher education, retirement, homeownership).

In theory, tax code–based public subsidies should help all families save and invest, but instead, wealthier households receive most of the benefits. In fact, a recent analysis of the largest wealth- building tax subsidies found that the top 1 percent of households received more benefits from these tax code–based subsidies than the bottom 80 percent combined.

The new brief answers key questions about tax expenditures: What are they, how do they work, and who benefits? In addition, since the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not collect tax data by race, the primer uses data related to the distribution of benefits by income quintiles and the demographics of each quintile to provide a rough approximation of how different racial and ethnic groups do or do not benefit from the different categories of tax expenditures.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Region

Overview

Omaha-Council Bluffs has a relatively strong and resilient regional economy, with overall low unemployment and steady job growth. At the same time, wages have stagnated for most workers and many communities of color face barriers to accessing good jobs, living wages, and the education needed for the jobs of the future. Increasing connections to good jobs, raising the floor for low-wage work, and building communities of opportunity metro-wide are key strategies to shift the region towards equitable growth. Download summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Region (Summary)

Overview

Omaha-Council Bluffs has a relatively strong and resilient regional economy, with overall low unemployment and steady job growth. At the same time, wages have stagnated for most workers and many communities of color face barriers to accessing good jobs, living wages, and the education needed for the jobs of the future. Increasing connections to good jobs, raising the floor for low-wage work, and building communities of opportunity metro-wide are key strategies to shift the region towards equitable growth. Download the full profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Piedmont Triad Region (Summary)

Overview

The Piedmont Triad region in North Carolina—covering 12 counties and home to the cities of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point—is a growing region whose demographics are rapidly changing. Communities of color are driving growth, and have increased from 20 to 33 percent of the population since 1980. Ensuring its diverse residents can participate in the regional economy and contribute to stronger job growth and broadly shared prosperity is critical for the region’s future. Growing good jobs, investing in its workforce, and infusing economic inclusion into economic development and growth strategies are promising strategies. Download the profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Piedmont Triad Region

Overview

The Piedmont Triad region in North Carolina—covering 12 counties and home to the cities of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point—is a growing region whose demographics are rapidly changing. Communities of color are driving growth, and have increased from 20 to 33 percent of the population since 1980. Ensuring its diverse residents can participate in the regional economy and contribute to stronger job growth and broadly shared prosperity is critical for the region’s future. Growing good jobs, investing in its workforce, and infusing economic inclusion into economic development and growth strategies are promising strategies. Download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

A Developmental Pathway for Achieving Promise Neighborhoods Results

Overview

This important tool was developed to help Promise Neighborhood communities and the field at large better understand the external conditions and developmental milestones that are needed to build the cradle to career continuum and to achieve the goals/outcomes set forth in Promise Neighborhoods. The tool illustrates the developmental pathways necessary to achieve the Promise Neighborhoods vision.

Getting Equity Advocacy Results: Tools for Navigating Change - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Equity advocates know the power of policy. Policy determines the rules by which opportunities are framed and delivered — what is allowed, encouraged, discouraged, and prohibited. Advocacy — the art of influence and persuasion — is essential for fostering the creation, adoption, and implementation of promising policy solutions that catalyze social change. (2014)

Getting Equity Advocacy Results: Build, Advance and Defend - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Equity advocacy does not — and should not — cease when a favorable policy outcome is first reached. In fact, it is through the continued effort of equity advocates, champions, and their allies that policy changes to promote equity are implemented and embedded into practice.

Getting Equity Advocacy Results: Build the Base for Equity Advocacy - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Changing the challenging conditions that affect low-income people and communities of color requires a “grassroots to treetops” approach that connects the experiences of people on the ground with the decisions about policies that shape communities. (2014)

Getting Equity Advocacy Results: Move the Equity Proposal - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Opportunities to advance equity abound in the numerous activities associated with different advocacy efforts. (2014)

Getting Equity Advocacy Results: Name and Frame the Equity Solution - Equitable Development Toolkit

Overview

Equity advocacy efforts require a great deal of preparation before a campaign for equity can be undertaken. (2014)

Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters: A Review of the Research

Overview

A new joint report by PolicyLink and The Food Trust, Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters: A Review of the Research, underscores Health Equity and Place as the foundation necessary for reaping the positive benefits associated with healthy food. (Full report)

Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters: A Review of the Research

Overview

A new joint report by PolicyLink and The Food Trust, Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters: A Review of the Research, underscores healthy food access as the foundation necessary for reaping the positive benefits associated with healthy food. (Summary)

An Equity Profile of Kansas City Region

Overview

The Equity Profiles inform planning, policymaking, and community action in regions and states. Download the summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Kansas City Region Summary

Overview

The Equity Profiles inform planning, policymaking, and community action in regions and states. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

Economic and Community Development Outcomes of Healthy Food Retail

Overview

Illustrates the connection between improved healthy food access and resulting economic and community development, encouraging readers to include assessment of economic outcomes in their healthy food access research agenda, and provides evidence to support decision makers in advancing healthy food policies.

Maximizing Walkability, Diversity, and Educational Equity in U.S. Schools

Overview

This new report, drawn from a national dialogue among leaders in health and public education, with accompanying research, answers the question in the affirmative. It also outlines the factors that determine how and where schools get built for different populations, and proposes action steps for promoting diverse, walkable, high quality schools for all children.

An Equity Profile of Rhode Island

Overview

This Rhode Island profile documents the state's rapid demographic shift and performance on a host of equity indicators. Download summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Rhode Island Summary

Overview

Summary: This Rhode Island profile documents the state's rapid demographic shift and performance on a host of equity indicators. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

Advancing Environmental Justice through Sustainability Planning (Full Report)

Overview

Explains why addressing environmental justice (EJ) is a key aspect of creating sustainable regions, and presents ways in which those involved in local and regional planning can achieve EJ in their communities.

California Unincorportated: Mapping Disadvantaged Communities in the San Joaquin Valley

Overview

This document describes the new methods for identifying, measuring, and mapping disadvantaged unincorporated communities and a first account of the findings from applying these new methods to the San Joaquin Valley. For readers seeking the complete technical details of the data sources and methods, please see the Technical Guide on the Community Equity Initiative website.

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