June 2017

An Equity Profile of Las Cruces

Overview

Las Cruces, New Mexico is already 63 percent people of color; growth and transformation in the city has been driven mostly by an increase in the Latino population. By growing good jobs, connecting younger generations with older ones, integrating immigrants into the economy, building communities of opportunity, and ensuring educational and career pathways, the city can secure a bright future for the city and region. This equity analysis was developed with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Read the full profile.

June 2017

An Equity Profile of Farmington

Overview

Farmington, New Mexico is already 50 percent people of color; growth and transformation in the city has been driven mostly by an increase in the Latino and Native American populations. Farmington’s diversity is a major asset in the regional economy, but inequities and disparities are holding the city back. Equitable growth is the path to sustained economic prosperity in the city and region. Knowing how a community stands in terms of equity is a critical first step in planning for greater equity. This equity analysis was developed with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Read the full profile.

June 2017

An Equity Profile of Battle Creek

Overview

Battle Creek, Michigan is becoming a majority people-of-color city, and communities of color will continue to drive growth and change into the foreseeable future. Embedding an equity approach throughout city government and advancing policy strategies to grow good jobs, build healthy communities of opportunity, prevent displacement, and ensure just policing and court systems, is fundamental to a brighter future for all of Battle Creek’s residents.  This equity profile was developed with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to support local community groups, elected officials, planners, business leaders, funders, and others working to build a stronger and more equitable city and region. Read the full profile.

June 2017

An Equity Profile of Detroit City

Overview

After decades of job and population loss, the City of Detroit has shown recent signs of growth. However, this Detroit Renaissance is not enjoyed equally by all residents; deep racial disparities, declining wages, and a hollowing out of middle-wage, high-opportunity jobs threaten the city’s rebound and economic viability. Equitable development strategies will be essential if growth is to have an appreciable impact on poverty, inequality, and racial disparities. This equity profile was developed with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to support local community groups, elected officials, planners, business leaders, funders, and others working to build a stronger and more equitable city. Read the full profile.

April 2017

An Equity Profile of Long Island

Overview

Long Island – defined as Nassau and Suffolk counties – is rapidly diversifying. Today, one in three Long Island residents is a person of color – up from roughly one in 10 residents in 1980. Black Long Islanders, who were largely excluded from the massive federally subsidized suburban development that characterizes Long Island, continue to face barriers to full social, economic, and political inclusion. This profile shows how persistent segregation and racial disparities in wealth, housing, educational attainment and many other areas is costing Long Island billions of dollars in potential economic growth each year. The accompanying policy brief provides a series of recommendations designed to close the racial wealth divide which would result in a major boost to Long Island’s economy. It was produced by PolicyLink and PERE, with lead support from Citi Community Development and funding from Long Island Community Foundation and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Read the policy brief and profile, and see the press release.

Media: Long Island is Missing More than $24 Billion (Next City), Report: Racial Inequities Cost LI’s Economy Billions Each Year (Newsday), Racial Equity Needed for LI’s Growth, Urban League Leader Says (Newsday)

February 2018

An Equity Profile of Sacramento Region

Overview

This profile analyzes the state of health equity and inclusive growth in the Sacramento region, and the accompanying policy brief, Health Equity Now: Toward an All-In Sacramento, summarizes the data and presents recommendations to advance health equity and inclusive growth. They were created by PolicyLink and the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) in partnership with the Healthy Sacramento Coalition, whose broader vision is to eliminate health inequities in Sacramento. This equity analysis was developed with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Read the profile and policy brief.

Media: Sick Stats: New Report Says Lack of Action on Community Health is Costing Sacramento (NewsReview.com)

June 2017

An Equity Profile of Las Cruces

Overview

Las Cruces, New Mexico is already 63 percent people of color; growth and transformation in the city has been driven mostly by an increase in the Latino population. By growing good jobs, connecting younger generations with older ones, integrating immigrants into the economy, building communities of opportunity, and ensuring educational and career pathways, the city can secure a bright future for the city and region. This equity analysis was developed with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Read the profile.

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Atlanta Fact Sheet

August 2019

Leveraging Data to Support Economic Justice Policy Campaigns in New Mexico

Overview

With the third-highest level of working poverty in the country, many New Mexican families are already struggling to make ends meet, and predatory financial services further strip their wealth and exacerbate financial insecurity. The New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty (NMCLP) is working to protect low-income communities from predatory lenders and tax preparation services. PolicyLink, Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) at the University of Southern California, and NMCLP, with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, co-produced two fact sheets: one highlighting the impact of predatory lenders on Native American communities, and one describing how expensive tax preparation services cost New Mexican families up to $54 million in 2015. These tools will support NMCLP’s policy campaigns to regulate predatory financial services and protect working families. Download Ensuring New Mexicans Receive Their Full Tax Refund and New Mexicans Deserve Fair Loans.

June 2018

Advancing Employment Equity in Rural North Carolina

Overview

North Carolina has the second largest rural population in the country, with one in three residents living in rural areas. Rural North Carolinians face higher levels of unemployment and poverty than their urban counterparts, and earn lower incomes. Changing this situation and achieving employment equity — when everyone who wants to work has access to a job that pays family-supporting wages and the lack of a good job cannot be predicted by race, gender, or geography — is crucial to the economic future of not only rural North Carolina, but that of the entire state. This is the fourth of five briefs about employment equity in southern states produced by the National Equity Atlas partnership with the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. This report was released in partnership with Rural Forward NC and the NC Budget & Tax Center. Download the report, detailed methodology, and fact sheet.

September 2018

Building an Inclusive Health Workforce in California: A Statewide Policy Agenda

Overview

An equitable and inclusive health-care workforce in California—one that reflects the state’s racial, ethnic, and linguistic diversity and offers all Californians a chance at a meaningful job—is not only a moral obligation but also an urgent economic imperative. Increasing diversity in the health sector will also be critical for improving health and eliminating racial inequities through the provision of culturally appropriate services for all communities. As the demand for health-care workers continues to increase nationally, this trend plays out significantly in California, a state that employs over 1.3 million health workers and is projected to need an additional 450,000 by 2020. However, longstanding structural inequities in education, workforce training, and employment access create serious barriers that prevent many Californians, particularly people of color, from benefiting from the emerging training and job opportunities. This report explores the powerful trends driving demand for health-care workers, the key equity challenges to filling these gaps; and a robust set of strategies and specific policies that state leaders can undertake to foster a more inclusive health workforce.

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Milwaukee Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Brooklyn Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Alameda Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Chicago Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Rochester Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Dallas Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Santa Ana Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Denver Fact Sheet

September 2017

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Santa Barbara Fact Sheet

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