When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Providence Fact Sheet

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Santa Barbara Fact Sheet

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Santa Rosa Fact Sheet

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Springfield (MA) Fact Sheet

An Equity Profile of Grand Rapids

Overview

Grand Rapids is an increasingly diverse city. While it has experienced some overall population loss over the last decade, communities of color have significantly grown – and their ability to participate and thrive is central to the city’s success. This profile shows how equitable growth is the path to sustained economic prosperity in the region. It was developed with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to assist local community groups, elected officials, planners, business leaders, funders, and others working to build a stronger and more equitable city. Read the full profile.

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: National and City Fact Sheets

Overview

Renters now represent the majority in the nation’s 100 largest cities, and contribute billions to local economies. Yet renters face a toxic mix of rising rents and stagnant wages, both of which add up to an unprecedented affordability crisis that stymies their ability to contribute to the broader economy and thrive. This analysis, produced in support of the Renter Week of Action occurring September 16-24, reveals what renters and the nation stand to gain from addressing this crisis. We find that nationwide, if renters paid only what was affordable for housing, they would have $124 billion extra to spend in the community every year, or $6,200 per rent-burdened household. Download the national fact sheet and press release.

You can also download fact sheets for the following cities: Alameda, Atlanta, Baltimore, Birmingham, Boston, Bowling Green (KY), Brooklyn, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Durham, El Paso, Jackson, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Lynn (MA), Miami, Minneapolis, Nashville, Newark, New YorkOakland, Philadelphia, PittsburghPortland, Providence, RenoRochester, San Diego, Santa Ana, Santa Barbara, Santa Rosa, Seattle, Spokane, Springfield (MA), St. Paul, Washington DC.

An Equity Profile of Sacramento Region

Overview

This profile analyzes the state of health equity and inclusive growth in the Sacramento region, and the accompanying policy brief, Health Equity Now: Toward an All-In Sacramento, summarizes the data and presents recommendations to advance health equity and inclusive growth. They were created by PolicyLink and the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) in partnership with the Healthy Sacramento Coalition, whose broader vision is to eliminate health inequities in Sacramento.

An Equity Profile of Albuquerque

Overview

Albuquerque is a growing, majority people-of-color city that is becoming even more diverse as communities of color drive the city’s growth. Embracing this rising diversity as an asset and addressing persistent racial and economic inequities is critical to the city’s prosperity. We estimate that the Albuquerque metro economy would have been $11 billion larger in 2015 absent its racial inequities in income. This profile was produced by the National Equity Atlas partnership with the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The profile was released in partnership with the City of Albuquerque and New Mexico Voices for Children, and will serve as a guide for the city’s new Office of Equity and Inclusion to set its racial and economic equity agenda. Read the profile, one-page summary, and press release.

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Long Beach Fact Sheet

An Equity Profile of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Region

Overview

This profile is an update to the original profile released in December 2014 to help Heartland 2050, a community-driven initiative working toward a common vision for the Omaha-Council Bluffs region in Nebraska and Iowa, implement its plan for equitable growth. The Omaha-Council Bluffs region continues to undergo a demographic transformation that has major implications for how the region charts a future of sustainable, inclusive prosperity. Communities of color – particularly a growing Latino population – are driving population growth in the region, making their ability to participate in the economy and thrive central to the region’s success. Our updated analysis finds that closing wide racial gaps in income could have boosted the regional economy by nearly $4.8 billion in 2015. Read the profile, summary, and view the press release.

Building an Inclusive Health Workforce in California: A Statewide Policy Agenda

Overview

An equitable and inclusive health-care workforce in California—one that reflects the state’s racial, ethnic, and linguistic diversity and offers all Californians a chance at a meaningful job—is not only a moral obligation but also an urgent economic imperative. Increasing diversity in the health sector will also be critical for improving health and eliminating racial inequities through the provision of culturally appropriate services for all communities. As the demand for health-care workers continues to increase nationally, this trend plays out significantly in California, a state that employs over 1.3 million health workers and is projected to need an additional 450,000 by 2020. However, longstanding structural inequities in education, workforce training, and employment access create serious barriers that prevent many Californians, particularly people of color, from benefiting from the emerging training and job opportunities. This report explores the powerful trends driving demand for health-care workers, the key equity challenges to filling these gaps; and a robust set of strategies and specific policies that state leaders can undertake to foster a more inclusive health workforce.

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Washington DC Fact Sheet

Counting a Diverse Nation: Disaggregating Data on Race and Ethnicity to Advance a Culture of Health

Overview

Racial and ethnic health disparities and inequities can only be eliminated if high-quality information is available by which to track immediate problems and the underlying social determinants of health. Such information can guide the design and application of culturally specific approaches to medicine and public health. Often, health outcomes are disaggregated only by broad racial and ethnic categories such as White, Black, or Hispanic. However, the great, and growing, diversity of the American population means that people’s actual experiences are much more specific. This project was a multifaceted investigation of the leading issues and opportunities for disaggregating data by race and ethnicity for use in furthering health equity. It recommends changes and improvements to the conduct of research and data collection and to the government and corporate policies that define priorities and allocate resources. This report was supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Advancing Employment Equity in Rural North Carolina

Overview

North Carolina has the second largest rural population in the country, with one in three residents living in rural areas. Rural North Carolinians face higher levels of unemployment and poverty than their urban counterparts, and earn lower incomes. Changing this situation and achieving employment equity — when everyone who wants to work has access to a job that pays family-supporting wages and the lack of a good job cannot be predicted by race, gender, or geography — is crucial to the economic future of not only rural North Carolina, but that of the entire state. This is the fourth of five briefs about employment equity in southern states produced by the National Equity Atlas partnership with the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. This report was released in partnership with Rural Forward NC and the NC Budget & Tax Center. Download the report, detailed methodology, and fact sheet.

Building Financially Secure Futures: An Approach for Boys and Men of Color

High-Quality, Affordable Childcare for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how increasing access to high-quality and affordable childcare benefits families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

Criminal Justice Reform: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how transforming the nation’s criminal justice system into one that distributes justice fairly and promotes rehabilitation would benefit families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

High-Quality Education for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how creating an equitable pre-K through 12 educational system can benefit families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

High-Quality Elder Care for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how increasing access to high-quality and affordable elder care benefits families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

Just and Fair Employment for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how connecting people to just and fair work benefits families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

An Equitable Food System: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes the benefits of building an equitable food system for families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

High-Quality, Affordable Health Care for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how ensuring access to high-quality, affordable health care for all can benefit families, communities, and the economy.

Healthy Environments for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes the economic benefits of creating healthy environments for all—both through targeted strategies that improve the quality of neighborhood environments where low-income people of color live and work, and through larger-scale shifts toward a clean energy economy that does not rely on fossil fuels.

Find other equity briefs here.

Homes for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes the economic and community benefits of ensuring every family can live in an affordable home.

Find other equity briefs here.

Immigrant Inclusion: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how immigrant inclusion can benefit families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

LGBTQ Inclusion: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes the importance of ensuring the economic inclusion of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning) people.

It is one of thirteen briefs -- produced with the the Marguerite Casey Foundation -- that describe key challenges and strategies to advance equity within the issue area; provide relevant data points and research findings on the economic benefits of equity; and share an inspiring example of a win-win solution for equity and the economy already being implemented.

Find other equity briefs here.

Transportation for All: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how building an equitable transportation system benefits families, communities, and the economy.

Youth Engagement: Good for Families, Communities, and the Economy

Overview

This issue brief describes how engaging youth benefits families, communities, and the economy.

Find other equity briefs here.

Leveraging Anchor Institutions for Economic Inclusion

Overview

Anchor institutions, such as colleges and universities, hospitals and health-care facilities, utilities, faith-based organizations and museums have a role to play in driving economic growth. This brief is an introduction to developing and implementing an anchor strategy that can advance equity and economic inclusion in order to promote regional prosperity. It provides actionable recommendations for federal Economic Resilience and Sustainable Communities grantees and their broad range of regional partners.

An Equity Profile of the Cape Fear Region

Overview

The Cape Fear region in North Carolina is experiencing a demographic transformation characterized by a diversifying younger population and a rapidly growing senior population that is predominantly White. To secure a thriving economy for the decades to come, the region must tap the economic potential of its growing young population. Building education and career pathways for all and ensuring young workers are prepared for the jobs of the future are key strategies for inclusive growth in the region. Download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the Cape Fear Region (Summary)

Overview

The Cape Fear region in North Carolina is experiencing a demographic transformation characterized by a diversifying younger population and a rapidly growing senior population that is predominantly White. To secure a thriving economy for the decades to come, the region must tap the economic potential of its growing young population. Building education and career pathways for all and ensuring young workers are prepared for the jobs of the future are key strategies for inclusive growth in the region. Download the full profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the Research Triangle Region

Overview

The Research Triangle Region has a long tradition of growth and change, as its research universities and technologically sophisticated businesses have served markets and attracted people from across the United States and around the world. From the city cores of Raleigh and Durham to small towns and rural areas throughout the region, the communities that make up the Research Triangle have a common goal of seeing that all its people have pathways to success. Download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the Research Triangle Region (Summary)

Overview

The Research Triangle Region has a long tradition of growth and change, as its research universities and technologically sophisticated businesses have served markets and attracted people from across the United States and around the world. From the city cores of Raleigh and Durham to small towns and rural areas throughout the region, the communities that make up the Research Triangle have a common goal of seeing that all its people have pathways to success. Download the full profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the San Francisco Bay Area Region

Overview

The Bay Area is booming, but a rising tide economy is not lifting up its low-income communities and communities of color. As communities of color continue to drive growth and change in the region, addressing wide racial inequities and ensuring people of color can fully participate as workers, entrepreneurs, and innovators is an urgent priority. Our analysis finds that the regional economy could have been $117 billion stronger in 2012 had its racial gaps in income and employment. This profile, produced for The San Francisco Foundation, describes the region’s demographic transformation and performance on a series of equity indicators. Download summary here.

An Equity Profile of the San Francisco Bay Area Region (Summary)

Overview

The Bay Area is booming, but a rising tide economy is not lifting up its low-income communities and communities of color. As communities of color continue to drive growth and change in the region, addressing wide racial inequities and ensuring people of color can fully participate as workers, entrepreneurs, and innovators is an urgent priority. Our analysis finds that the regional economy could have been $117 billion stronger in 2012 had its racial gaps in income and employment. This profile, produced for The San Francisco Foundation, describes the region’s demographic transformation and performance on a series of equity indicators. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Detroit

Overview

The Detroit region is undergoing growth and change. After losing approximately 156,000 people between 2000 and 2010, the region is projected to reverse its recent losses and grow by about 5 percent over the next 30 years. People of color will make up a growing share of the population, with much of that growth propelled by Latinos and Asians. An infusion of new public and private investments along with middle-wage job growth is also fueling an economic recovery, what some have called a Detroit Renaissance. However, not everyone will benefit unless business, community, and political leaders work together to connect people of color to jobs, business opportunities, quality education and career training, and healthy homes and neighborhoods. Download summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Detroit - Summary

Overview

The Detroit region is undergoing growth and change. After losing approximately 156,000 people between 2000 and 2010, the region is projected to reverse its recent losses and grow by about 5 percent over the next 30 years. People of color will make up a growing share of the population, with much of that growth propelled by Latinos and Asians. An infusion of new public and private investments along with middle-wage job growth is also fueling an economic recovery, what some have called a Detroit Renaissance. However, not everyone will benefit unless business, community, and political leaders work together to connect people of color to jobs, business opportunities, quality education and career training, and healthy homes and neighborhoods. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

Strengthening the Pine Ridge Economy

Overview

The Pine Ridge reservation, home of Oglala Lakota people, sits within a broader regional economic context whose primary sectors include tourism, agriculture, manufacturing, and retail.1 The Pine Ridge Reservation and the Rapid City Metropolitan area are interdependent economies that, to date, channel many economic benefits off-reservation. This Equity and Opportunity Assessment identifies key strategies to create greater vibrancy and equity in reservation-based economic activity—to increase prosperity and quality of life for both the Oglala Lakota people and the region as a whole.

An Equity Profile of Southeast Florida Region

Overview

Communities of color are driving Southeast Florida’s population growth, and their ability to participate and thrive is central to the region’s economic success. But wide racial gaps in income, health, and opportunity place its future at risk. Creating good jobs, connecting youth and vulnerable workers to training and career pathways, and increasing access to economic opportunities can secure a bright economic future for the region. PolicyLink and the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) produced this profile in partnership with the Southeast Florida Regional Planning Partnership. You can also download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of the Houston-Galveston Region, Addendum

Overview

Houston-Galveston is characterized by overall economic strength and resilience, but wide racial gaps in income, health, and opportunity coupled with declining wages, a shrinking middle class, and rising inequality place the region’s economic success and future at risk. Our analysis showed the region already stands to gain a great deal from addressing racial inequities. If racial gaps in income had been closed in 2012, the regional economy would have been $243.3 billion stronger: a 54 percent increase. You can also download the full profile and summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

Building an Equitable Tax Code: A Primer for Advocates

Overview

In recent years a national discussion has been underway about the causes and effects of growing inequality, but one cause that has received little attention is the role of the U.S. tax code. The individual tax code contains more than $1 trillion in tax subsidies known to policymakers and economists as tax expenditures because, like spending programs, they provide financial assistance to support specific activities or groups of people. Of these subsidies, more than half a trillion, $540 billion, support some form of savings or investment (e.g., higher education, retirement, homeownership).

In theory, tax code–based public subsidies should help all families save and invest, but instead, wealthier households receive most of the benefits. In fact, a recent analysis of the largest wealth- building tax subsidies found that the top 1 percent of households received more benefits from these tax code–based subsidies than the bottom 80 percent combined.

The new brief answers key questions about tax expenditures: What are they, how do they work, and who benefits? In addition, since the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not collect tax data by race, the primer uses data related to the distribution of benefits by income quintiles and the demographics of each quintile to provide a rough approximation of how different racial and ethnic groups do or do not benefit from the different categories of tax expenditures.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Region

Overview

Omaha-Council Bluffs has a relatively strong and resilient regional economy, with overall low unemployment and steady job growth. At the same time, wages have stagnated for most workers and many communities of color face barriers to accessing good jobs, living wages, and the education needed for the jobs of the future. Increasing connections to good jobs, raising the floor for low-wage work, and building communities of opportunity metro-wide are key strategies to shift the region towards equitable growth. Download summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Region (Summary)

Overview

Omaha-Council Bluffs has a relatively strong and resilient regional economy, with overall low unemployment and steady job growth. At the same time, wages have stagnated for most workers and many communities of color face barriers to accessing good jobs, living wages, and the education needed for the jobs of the future. Increasing connections to good jobs, raising the floor for low-wage work, and building communities of opportunity metro-wide are key strategies to shift the region towards equitable growth. Download the full profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Piedmont Triad Region (Summary)

Overview

The Piedmont Triad region in North Carolina—covering 12 counties and home to the cities of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point—is a growing region whose demographics are rapidly changing. Communities of color are driving growth, and have increased from 20 to 33 percent of the population since 1980. Ensuring its diverse residents can participate in the regional economy and contribute to stronger job growth and broadly shared prosperity is critical for the region’s future. Growing good jobs, investing in its workforce, and infusing economic inclusion into economic development and growth strategies are promising strategies. Download the profile.

Find other equity profiles here.

Equitable Growth Profile of the Piedmont Triad Region

Overview

The Piedmont Triad region in North Carolina—covering 12 counties and home to the cities of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point—is a growing region whose demographics are rapidly changing. Communities of color are driving growth, and have increased from 20 to 33 percent of the population since 1980. Ensuring its diverse residents can participate in the regional economy and contribute to stronger job growth and broadly shared prosperity is critical for the region’s future. Growing good jobs, investing in its workforce, and infusing economic inclusion into economic development and growth strategies are promising strategies. Download the summary.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Kansas City Region

Overview

The Equity Profiles inform planning, policymaking, and community action in regions and states. Download the summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Kansas City Region Summary

Overview

The Equity Profiles inform planning, policymaking, and community action in regions and states. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Rhode Island

Overview

This Rhode Island profile documents the state's rapid demographic shift and performance on a host of equity indicators. Download summary here.

Find other equity profiles here.

An Equity Profile of Rhode Island Summary

Overview

Summary: This Rhode Island profile documents the state's rapid demographic shift and performance on a host of equity indicators. Download the full report.

Find other equity profiles here.

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