Remembering Dori Maynard

25 Feb 2015 | Angela Glover Blackwell
Remembering Dori Maynard
Above: Dori Maynard

She was her father’s daughter. Or, as she told an assembled audience at Black Male Re-imagined II in March 2013, “a daddy’s girl.”  She spoke those words with such pride that she lit up the stage.
 
Indeed, Dori Maynard was a bright, shining star in the galaxy of leaders committed to changing perceptions, opportunities, and outcomes for Black boys and men — and indeed for all people of color. Her years as a journalist taught her the importance of getting the story right. Her father, Robert, was a journalist, former owner of the Oakland Tribune, and co-founder of The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, the nation’s oldest organization dedicated to helping the news media accurately portray all segments of society, particularly those often overlooked, such as communities of color.  As president of the Institute, Dori extended her father’s legacy by recruiting and training journalists. Both were Neiman Fellows at Harvard.
 
Dori was smart, warm, and a joy to commune with. Over meals, engaged in deep conversation, or providing astute comments in meetings, her passion, commitment, and determination to make change happen was always evident.  She believed in speaking truth to power and never shied away from talking about race and racism.
 
She will be missed for her leadership of a critical organization, for her friendship, and for being the loving and unique individual who shared her light with so many.