When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Washington DC Fact Sheet

Counting a Diverse Nation: Disaggregating Data on Race and Ethnicity to Advance a Culture of Health

Overview

Racial and ethnic health disparities and inequities can only be eliminated if high-quality information is available by which to track immediate problems and the underlying social determinants of health. Such information can guide the design and application of culturally specific approaches to medicine and public health. Often, health outcomes are disaggregated only by broad racial and ethnic categories such as White, Black, or Hispanic. However, the great, and growing, diversity of the American population means that people’s actual experiences are much more specific. This project was a multifaceted investigation of the leading issues and opportunities for disaggregating data by race and ethnicity for use in furthering health equity. It recommends changes and improvements to the conduct of research and data collection and to the government and corporate policies that define priorities and allocate resources. This report was supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Advancing Employment Equity in Rural North Carolina

Overview

North Carolina has the second largest rural population in the country, with one in three residents living in rural areas. Rural North Carolinians face higher levels of unemployment and poverty than their urban counterparts, and earn lower incomes. Changing this situation and achieving employment equity — when everyone who wants to work has access to a job that pays family-supporting wages and the lack of a good job cannot be predicted by race, gender, or geography — is crucial to the economic future of not only rural North Carolina, but that of the entire state. This is the fourth of five briefs about employment equity in southern states produced by the National Equity Atlas partnership with the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. This report was released in partnership with Rural Forward NC and the NC Budget & Tax Center. Download the report, detailed methodology, and fact sheet.

Building Financially Secure Futures: An Approach for Boys and Men of Color

Cultivating Equitable Food-Oriented Development: Lessons from West Oakland

Overview

The second of a three-part series by PolicyLink and Mandela MarketPlace, this case study highlights the ongoing work of Mandela MarketPlace and its partners to build a local food system that prioritizes community ownership in the San Francisco Bay Area. The case study explores how the Mandela ecosystem has grown and evolved, and the operations, inner workings, and relationships across its tightly woven network. View the accompanying photo essay, with original photography from Mandela MartketPlace, including a photo courtesy of Michael Short Photography.

Read the first case study, Transforming West Oakland: A Case Study Series on Mandela MarketPlace, which tells the history and background of the organization and outlines critical factors that contributed to its existing infrastructure and framework of local ownership. View the accompanying photo essay, with original photography from Mandela MartketPlace, and read this blog post by Dana Harvey, executive director at Mandela MarketPlace.

An Equity Profile of Albuquerque

Overview

Albuquerque is a growing, majority people-of-color city that is becoming even more diverse as communities of color drive the city’s growth. Embracing this rising diversity as an asset and addressing persistent racial and economic inequities is critical to the city’s prosperity. We estimate that the Albuquerque metro economy would have been $11 billion larger in 2015 absent its racial inequities in income. This profile was produced by the National Equity Atlas partnership with the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) with the support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The profile was released in partnership with the City of Albuquerque and New Mexico Voices for Children, and will serve as a guide for the city’s new Office of Equity and Inclusion to set its racial and economic equity agenda. Read the profile, one-page summary, and press release.

An Equity Profile of Orange County

Overview

Like much of California, Orange County experienced demographic change ahead of national shifts and will continue to do so through at least 2050. Today about 58 percent are residents of color; however racial and economic inequalities persist, threatening future prosperity countywide. This profile examines demographic trends and indicators of equitable growth, highlighting strengths and areas of vulnerability in relation to the goal of building a strong, resilient economy. It was developed by PolicyLink and the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) to support Orange County funders, advocacy groups, elected officials, planners, business leaders, and others working to build a stronger and more equitable region. Find Summary here.

When Renters Rise, Cities Thrive: Long Beach Fact Sheet

Competitive Advantage of Racial Equity

Overview

The Competitive Advantage of Racial Equity, and the accompanying op-ed in Fortune, both produced in partnership with FSG. It is our aspiration that these business strategies will complement the push, from outside and inside corporations, for more fair and equitable operations.

The report goes beyond the essential ingredient of workforce diversity, as a means for business to address past and continuing discrimination while improving their competitiveness, to challenge the corporate sector to affirmatively advance racial equity through its products, services, and public policy positions.

Find all related material for The Corporate Racial Equity Advantage

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