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March 2021

Fact Sheet: Preventing Eviction and Indebtedness in the Bay Area

Overview

In the Bay Area, as elsewhere, the coronavirus and its economic fallout have disproportionately impacted the very same people that were on the economic margins before the pandemic, including Black, Latinx, and immigrant communities (especially undocumented workers), and low-wage workers. And they are about to face an additional threat: the risk of being evicted when they can’t pay rent because they’ve lost jobs and income because of the pandemic. Without long-term eviction protections, these renters are at risk of being caught in a coming wave of evictions which could force them out of their neighborhoods or even onto the street.

This fact sheet was created to inform regional and local eviction prevention efforts in the Bay Area. Key findings include:

  • 137,500 Bay Area renter households were behind on rent in January 2021.
  • Bay Area renters face an estimated $488 million in rent debt, approximately $3,600 per household.
  • The vast majority of renters who are behind have experienced job and income losses during the pandemic: 78 percent have lost employment income.
  • 87 percent of renters who are behind are people of color, and 81 percent earn less than $75,000. Only 6 percent of households with incomes of $75,000 or more are behind on rent.

See the accompanying analysis of eviction risk in the Bay Areamethodology, and Spanish version.

This fact sheet updates the eviction risk fact estimates we produced in 2020 for Contra Costa County (fact sheet and analysis), San Mateo CountySonoma County, and California in partnership with the Raise the Roof Coalition, People’s Alliance of San Mateo County, North Bay Organizing Project, and Housing NOW!

March 2021

Fact Sheet: Preventing Eviction and Indebtedness in California

Overview

This fact sheet was created in partnership with Housing NOW! California, to support their work to advance policies that protect renters at risk of eviction during the Covid-19 emergency. This document was published in March 2021. You can also view the January 2021 version of the fact sheet here. Key findings include:

  • 814,200 million California renter households were behind on rent in January 2021, down from 1.1 million households in December 2020.
  • Californian renters face an estimated $2.4 billion in rent debt, approximately $2,900 per household.
  • The vast majority of renters who are behind have experienced job and income losses during the pandemic: 80 percent have lost employment income.
  • 77 percent of renters who are behind are people of color, and 77 percent earn less than $50,000. Only 6 percent of households with incomes $75,000 or more are behind on rent.

See the accompanying methodology and Spanish version.

Learn more about Housing NOW! California.

August 2020

Fact Sheet: COVID-19 Evictions in San Mateo County

Overview

This fact sheet was created in partnership with the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County, Community Legal Services in East Palo Alto, and Urban Habitat, member organizations of the People’s Alliance of San Mateo County, to support their work to advance policies that protect renters at risk of eviction during the COVID-19 emergency. Key findings include:

  • 7,900 San Mateo County households – including 4,800 children – are at imminent risk of eviction and homelessness if the county's eviction moratorium is lifted because they include one or 7ore workers who’ve lost their jobs and have no replacement income.
  • An additional 5,100 households could be at risk of eviction with the end of the weekly $600 Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation.

See the accompanying methodology.

Learn more about the People's Alliance of San Mateo County.

September 2020

The Coming Wave of Covid-19 Evictions: State and Local Fact Sheets

Overview

Over one third of residents in the United States are renters, including the majority of Black and Latino residents. Many renters were already facing a crisis due to soaring rents before the pandemic, and they have been hit hard by the virus and its economic impacts. Without long-term eviction protections, these renters are at risk of being caught in a coming wave of evictions which could force them out of their neighborhoods or even onto the street. In partnership with Our Homes, Our Health, the National Equity Atlas team created a series of fact sheets to support their work across the country to advance policies that protect renters at risk of eviction during the Covid-19 emergency. Our Homes, Our Health is a collaborative initiative of the National Housing Justice Grassroots Table, including the Center for Popular Democracy, Partnership for Working Families, People’s Action, the Right to the City Alliance, and Alliance for Housing Justice.

You can download fact sheets for the following states: California, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, and Washington. Fact sheets for the following local geographies are also available for download: Bay Area, CABedford County, TNContra Costa County, CA, San Mateo County, CA, and Sonoma County, CA. More fact sheets to come.

See the accompanying methodology for the state fact sheets. For the county fact sheets, please see the notes at the end of the individual fact sheets for a link to the methodology.

July 2020

Fact Sheet: COVID-19 Evictions in Sonoma County

Overview

This fact sheet was created in partnership with the North Bay Organizing Project to support their work in Sonoma County to advance policies that protect renters at risk of eviction during the COVID-19 emergency. Key findings include:

  • 7,000 Sonoma households – including 5,100 children – are at imminent risk of eviction and homelessness if the county's eviction moratorium is lifted because they include one or more workers who’ve lost their jobs and have no replacement income.

  • An additional 4,400 households could be at risk of eviction once the $600 weekly Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation ends.

See the accompanying methodology

Learn more about the North Bay Organizing Project.

July 2020

Fact Sheet: COVID-19 Evictions in Contra Costa County

Overview

This fact sheet was created in partnership with the Raise the Roof Coalition to support their work in Contra Costa County to advance policies that protect renters at risk of eviction during the COVID-19 emergency. Key findings include:

  • 14,000 Contra Costa County households – including 12,100 children – are at imminent risk of eviction and homelessness if the county's eviction moratorium is lifted because they include one or more workers who’ve lost their jobs and have no replacement income.
  • An additional 8,700 households could be at risk of eviction once the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation program ends on July 31.

See the accompanying analysis and methodology

Learn more about the campaign at www.facebook.com/raisetheroofconcord/

March 2020

Fair Labor Practices Benefit All New Mexican Families

Overview

New Mexican families rely on steady paychecks for groceries, childcare, transportation, and housing costs — spending that goes back to the community. So when employers refuse to pay workers their earned wages, everyone suffers. The New Mexico Worker Organizing Collaborative (NMWOC) works to combat these employer thefts to ensure that workers have a fair shot at economic security. In partnership with NMWOC, the National Equity Atlas co-produced a fact sheet that leverages local and National Equity Atlas data to illuminate those who are disproportionately vulnerable to employer theft and the need for the state to better investigate and enforce wage theft claims. This community data tool will support NMWOC in their advocacy to protect workers and take back lost wages. Download Fair Labor Practices Benefit All New Mexicans.

January 2019

Water Equity and Climate Resilience Caucus: Results, Priorities, Partners

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